Category: Northwest (Xinjiang, Shaanxi)

Xi'an beef potstickers

Fuchsia Dunlop’s Xi’an Beef Potstickers (Guotie, 锅贴)

From the Streets of Xi’an Ten years after Fuchsia Dunlop’s Every Grain of Rice was published, I am still finding new things to cook from it. The recipes are just as relevant and enticing  as they were when they were  written, which makes it a classic in the Chinese cookbook canon. Take these open-ended beef potstickers (guotie, 锅贴), which she learned from cooks in the Muslim Quarter of Xi’an. I’ve been to Xi’an, and I’ve still never seen anything like them! I don’t know how I missed them on my...

Spicy cumin beef on knife-cut noodles

Spicy Cumin Beef on Knife-Cut Noodles (Ft. Dried Daoxiaomian)

Handmade Noodle Nirvana, aka Northwest China This is another in our series about making famous Chinese restaurant noodle dishes not with the usual freshly made noodles but with premium dried noodles. If you have the time and skill to make hand-pulled, hand-ripped or knife-cut noodles on the regular, then you can stop here. But if you haven’t mastered Chinese noodle making and still want a damn good homemade version of spicy, tingly cumin beef on wide, ruffly noodles, then all you need is some high-quality dried mian in your pantry....

Sichuan-style shao kao BBQ

Sichuan-Style Shaokao (Chinese BBQ, 烧烤)

Introducing The Mala Market Xinjiang BBQ Shaokao Spice Shaokao (烧烤, shāokǎo), or Chinese barbeque, comes in many forms. The most famous is from the far west region of Xinjiang, where Uyghur Muslims have perfected cumin-dusted lamb skewers, but other areas of the country have taken Xinjiang BBQ and made it their own. In Sichuan, there is certainly no shortage of Muslim street grillers with their meat-laden carts and crusty rounds of nang bread. But there is also a more localized style of chuan, or skewers, that features less lamb and...

Xinjiang Cumin Lamb (Ziran Yangrou, 孜然羊肉)

Chengdu Challenge #14: The Mystery of ‘Sichuan Cumin Lamb’ Happy Year of the Sheep! No one in my family is a sheep, so this Chinese New Year just makes me think of food, and, more precisely, of lamb. It also gives me the perfect excuse to try to solve one of the biggest mysteries about Sichuan restaurants in America: Why do they always feature cumin lamb? Cumin lamb is not a Sichuan dish. Traditional Sichuan restaurants in Sichuan don’t serve lamb, and they rarely use cumin. And you won’t find a recipe for cumin lamb in any Sichuan...